Student Portal Faculty Portal Library Events

School of Counseling

Richmont Students Garner 98% Passing Record on National Counselor Examination

ATLANTA, GA and CHATTANOOGA, TN – (August 13, 2013)

In April, 62 of Richmont’s graduating students took the National Counselor Examination for Licensure and Certification (NCE) and scored and exceptionally high passing rate of 98.39% for the year.

When the NCE results were combined for Richmont’s Atlanta and Chattanooga campuses students’ scores surpassed the scores of other students from both CACREP accredited and Non-CACREP accredited institutions who took the exam in every single category.

“This year’s NCE scores simply confirm what many of us already knew: that the students and faculty at Richmont are incredibly talented,” said President Bob Rodgers. “The Board of Trustees and I are extremely proud of the quality of Richmont’s faculty and the performance of each of our students! This year’s passing rate and individual scores are not only nationally impressive, but they continue a well-established legacy of students score in the 90th percentile on the NCE.”

According to the National Board of Certified Counselors, the NCE is used to “…assess knowledge, skills, and abilities viewed as important for providing effective counseling services… It is intended to assess cognitive knowledge which should be known by all counselors regardless of their individual professional specialties.” After completing the four hour, 200 multiple choice question exam, students who satisfactorily perform on the NCE are eligible to become a National Certified Counselor (NCC). A passing score on the NCE is required for licensure as a professional counselor in most states, including Georgia and Tennessee.

“We are tremendously proud of our recent graduates who took the NCE,” said Dr. Keny Felix, Dean of the School of Counseling. “This year’s scores continue to reflect the high degree of academic excellence at Richmont. We look forward to our graduates’ continued success as they enter the mental health field and fulfill their calling as professional counselors.”

Richmont hosts Dr. Becky Beaton of TLC’s “Hoarding: Buried Alive” and the Chattanooga Area Psychotherapy Association

Chattanooga, Tennessee – (June 6, 2013)

The Chattanooga Area Psychotherapy Association (CAPA) is sponsoring a seminar on hoarding featuring Dr. Becky Beaton from TLC’s hit show “Hoarding: Buried Alive” on Richmont’s Chattanooga campus on Friday, June 14.

Event Link:

http://capaweb.net/Default.aspx?pageId=1178413&eventId=685636&EventViewMode=EventDe tails

Through this one-day workshop, participants will have the opportunity to obtain 6 continuing education credits. During the seminar, the following learning objectives will be accomplished:

  1. Explain the new DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for Hoarding Disorder, including the latest research and treatment.

  2. Discuss events throughout history such as war, the Great Depression, and natural disasters that effect multiple generations regarding attachment.

  3. Examine the etiology and progressive nature of this disorder, including the role that trauma, loss, and aging play in its development.

  4. Demonstrate treatment through film clips of Dr. Beaton and other experts treating clients on the television series “Hoarding: Buried Alive.”

  5. Participants will also explore their own attachment patterns regarding belongings.

While serving as one of TLC’s featured psychologists, Dr. Beaton is also the Director of the Anxiety and Stress Management Institute in Atlanta, GA. Her one-day clinic will help Southeastern clinicians better recognize and treat hoarding behaviors in their clients.

Richmont Graduate University is pleased to partner with CAPA by providing the venue for this seminar and hopes to continue collaborating in the future.

Henegar/CBI Counseling Center Clinician Comments on Adoption and Child Adaptability

Chattanooga, Tennessee – (May 17, 2013)

As Centerstone Foster Care is actively looking for more foster parents throughout Southeast Tennessee, Ed Doreau, of the Henegar/CBI Counseling Center, spoke with reporters from WDEF in Chattanooga and offered valuable clinical insights into child adoption and pre-adoption trauma. For WDEF’s full story and video, click here.

During his time with WDEF, Doreau confirmed that, in adoptive situations, children certainly can adapt, and, in some cases, to impressive degrees.

“”Adopted kids often come into the new family with a traumatic background,” said Doreau. “Even children who are adopted early may have been born addicted to drugs and have behavioral problems as a result.  It is important for the adopting families to know that they are not alone, there are resources and people who are willing to walk alongside them in this journey of caring for kids with trauma.”

Doreau, who recently joined the Henegar/CBI team, is a master’s level clinician who has invested much of his career and academic life focusing on the needs of teenage males as well as helping individuals struggling with addictions. He also has training in Motivational Interviewing, a mode of therapy seen as particularly helpful with addictions. He is currently accepting new clients.

For more than 30 years, the Henegar/CBI Counseling Center has offered a broad range of counseling and psychological services to the Chattanooga community. Pursuing the highest professional standards, Henegar/CBI’s licensed psychologists, marriage and family therapists, counselors, and insured student interns provide approximately 1,400 client sessions per month for residents throughout Eastern Tennessee. To learn more, or to schedule an appointment, call: 423-756-2894 or visit: www.cbicounseling.com. Open five days a week, the counseling center’s physical address is: 1815 McCallie Avenue, Chattanooga, TN 37404.

Richmont Confers Degrees on 83 Students in the Largest Graduating Class to Date

Atlanta, Georgia – (May 13, 2013)

On Saturday, May 11, the Board of Trustees at Richmont Graduate University conferred Master’s degrees on 83 candidates. As the university’s largest graduating class to date, 46 students received their Master of Arts in Marriage and Family Therapy, 31 received their Master of Arts in Professional Counseling, and 4 received a Master of Science in Christian Psychological Studies. An honorary doctorate celebrating Hugh Huffaker’s generous gifts of time, talent and treasure was also awarded. Additionally, one degree was awarded posthumously for Richmont student, Shelley Byers, who passed away earlier this year.

“The day was a beautiful celebration of God’s faithfulness, the devotion of the graduates, and the love and support of all the family and friends who were there,” said Richmont’s Dean of Students, Dr. DeAnne Terrell. “Our goal is always to bring God glory throughout the ceremony and our hearts are full of gratitude for the great things He has done.

In addition to honoring this year’s graduates, Richmont named Elizabeth Dial as 2013’s Distinguished Alumna. A Nationally Certified Licensed Professional Counselor, Dial now uses her Richmont training in private practice at Serenity Counseling & Consulting, as a staff psychotherapist for the North Georgia Health District and as a contracted trainer through Emory University’s SEATEC program.

Similarly, Moose Lutes, Richmont’s Director of Financial Aid, received this year’s Peterson Award for the commitment and service he has shown to the university that has consistently exceeded his job demands and institutional expectations.

The university was also pleased to host Dr. Timothy Irwin as this year’s graduation speaker. As a licensed clinical psychologist, Dr. Irwin is an acclaimed author on leadership, a managing partner of IrwinInc., and a trusted consultant for some of the nation’s most successful companies including SunTrust Banks, Chick-fil-A, IBM, Gerber Products Company, The Ritz Carlton Hotel Company, The Coca-Cola Company, and Turner Broadcasting Systems. His leadership guidance has also been featured on Fox News, via the Catalyst conference, and in publications such as Forbes, The Wall Street Journal, Business Week, and Investor’s Business Daily.

Speaking to Richmont’s newest graduates, Dr. Irwin encouraged students from Proverbs 4:23 and offered them several practical steps to take in avoiding the pitfalls that could disqualify them from leading, including: adopting a practice of frequent and rigorous self awareness; handling power with great care; speaking the truth of scripture into their lives; and creating a personal board of advisors. Overall, he graciously reminded students that their hearts are the core of their being and, even with all their excellent training, they should not get caught up in self-importance, but rather serve with humility.

Reflecting on the day, Dr. Keny Felix, Dean of the School of Counseling said, “Graduation is one of our most exciting times of the year. It is the culmination of years of diligent work on the part of students as they prepare to enter the field as counselors and marriage and family therapists or serve through various forms of ministry. We are certainly proud of the Class of 2013 and give God the glory for the privilege of witnessing his transformation in their lives during their tenure at Richmont. We are also grateful for the family members and friends who saw them through this season of their lives.”

Richmont Graduate University Names Bob Rodgers New President

Effective immediately, Robert G. (Bob) Rodgers, Jr. has been named President by the Richmont Graduate University Board of Trustees.

“Richmont is a highly respected university with excellent academic programs and a strong reputation and legacy,” said Rodgers. “We have incredible students, dedicated and gifted faculty and staff, and we are positioned to grow substantially in both the School of Counseling and the School of Ministry. I look forward to seeing Richmont’s students and staff transform lives and communities in even greater measure going forward.”

A former university trustee and donor, Rodgers joined the staff in 2010 in order to lead the university’s development efforts. He has served as Richmont’s Executive Vice President since 2011. As Executive Vice President, Rodgers has also held the position of COO, overseeing of the day-to-day operations of the university.

Before joining Richmont’s staff, Rodgers’ was the Founder and President of Quantum Search and has more than 24 years in leadership development, consulting and executive search in the not-for-profit, healthcare and general corporate arenas. He also previously served as Vice President of a nationwide restaurant company, with oversight responsibilities for 20,000+ associates in 21states.

“We are so fortunate to have found such a strong leader who already understands and believes in the mission of Richmont,” said Board Chair Jan Linder. “His presence provides exactly what we need at this strategically important time in our history.”

As an academic institution, Richmont currently hosts two campuses in Atlanta, Georgia and Chattanooga, Tennessee. Accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS), Richmont offers master’s-level training in professional counseling to help individuals, families and groups successfully confront life’s challenges. The mission of Richmont Graduate University is to provide Christ-centered education and research that advances God’s work of healing, restoration, and transformation in the lives of individuals, churches and communities. Presently, students have the opportunity to pursue master’s degrees in: Professional Counseling, Marriage and Family Therapy, Ministry, and Christian Psychological Studies as well as specializations in addictions, child and adolescent therapy, sex therapy, spirituality and counseling, and trauma counseling.

Additionally, in order to tangibly serve Richmont’s campus communities, the university hosts a network of Hope Counseling Centers throughout metro Atlanta, as well as the Henegar/CBI Counseling and Richmont Community Counseling Centers in Chattanooga. These centers offer counseling/mental health services to children, adults, families and groups of all walks of life, regardless of their insurance status.

For more information please contact: Jennifer Cooper
President’s Office
(404)835-6117

www.richmont.edu

WRCB Interviews Richmont Counselor about Boston Marathon Tragedy

CHATTANOOGA, TN (WRCB) – All eyes have been on Boston. Details continue emerging with each passing hour. For many of us, even hundreds of miles away in the Tennessee Valley, the images are emotional to watch.

From the Colorado movie theater massacre, to the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting, and now bombs exploding at the Boston Marathon, over the last several months, we’ve seen a lot of terrifying scenes unfold in our country.      
     
Local mental health professionals say just because they haven’t happened here, doesn’t mean we’re not affected.

“I think the worst lies we can tell ourselves is just because we weren’t there, that means we shouldn’t feel hurt or we should just get over it. This pain is real,” Mental Health Counselor Edward Doreau said.

Doreau is a Boston native and marathon runner. In 2009, he crossed that same finish line. 

“It’s an incredible feeling to finish and I think that’s why the terrorists probably targeted the finish line. They’re going after an American icon,” he said.

Shortly after the bombings, Doreau’s brother called from Boston to assure him his family and friends were unharmed.

“It was good to hear with the news that my friends who’d run the Boston Marathon were alright,” Doreau said.

But he says it’s likely even those of us with no ties to Boston are shaken.

“Traumatic incidents of national and global scale, they affect everybody,” he said.

He says the first feeling is typically of disbelief, but in the days following, may experience anxiety, nightmares and muscle tension. 

“An excessive alertness. When something traumatic happens, we feel shaken up by it and want to be constantly on your guard against something else happening,” Doreau said.

He says it’s the same reactions he’s treated people for following other recent national tragedies.

To read more and watch the video, Click Here.

Trent Gilbert to present at SACAC

Atlanta, Georgia – (April 2, 2013)

This April, Trent Gilbert, Vice President for Enrollment at Richmont Graduate University, and Tyler Peterson, Associate Provost of Enrollment Management at Auburn University at Montgomery, will co-present a seminar at the Southern Association for College Admission Counseling’s (SACAC) annual conference.  Their workshop, “Distilling the Campus Visit Experience,” is based on real-world experiences and will help admissions counselors learn how to successfully host visitors on campus.

“Our session at SACAC will be a great opportunity to continue to share the importance of the overall experience that a prospective student has while interacting on their campus visit,” said Peterson. “Trent Gilbert has been one of the frontrunners of this philosophy in higher education, and the schools that are taking his advice are seeing success. It is important that we look outside of higher education for ideas, and a lot of companies are providing great experiences for their customers, and the experience we offer our students should be just as strong.”

As an affiliate of the National Association for College Admission Counseling (NACAC), SACAC represents approximately 1,500 members throughout the Southeast in order to “…to promote high professional standards in the college admission process by exchanging ideas, sharing common goals and preparing counselors to serve students in the transition from high school to college.” This year, Richmont will be one of 95 universities in attendance at the 2013 conference.

“SACAC always provides great opportunities to share successes and failures as well as to learn how other schools are overcoming the challenges facing admission offices today,” said Gilbert. “Tyler and I believe higher education admission departments could use some fresh ideas, so it will be a fun opportunity for us to present on ways that ideas from the “outside world” can be utilized.”

Special Event on June 14th: Introduction to DSM-5: An Overview

William F. Doverspike, Ph.D. has published articles and presented workshops on various DSM classifications systems. He is the author of the Multiaxial Diagnostic Inventory-Revised Version, a criterion-referenced diagnostic screening instrument that evolved out of his work with differential diagnostic assessment. He holds board certification Diplomats in Clinical Psychology (ABPP) and Neuropsychology (ABPN). He maintains a practice at the Atlanta Counseling Center.

He teaches Psychopathology as an Adjuct Professor at Richmont Graduate University in Atlanta, and he teaches Professional Ethics as an Adjunct Professor at Emory University.

The workshop will consist of an overview of empirical research and organizing principles that have contributed to the development of the DSM-5. There will be some discussion of changes in organization and content that have been announced by the American Psychiatric Association. DSM and DSM-5 are registered trademarks of the American Psychiatric Association. The American Psychiatric Association is not affiliated with nor endorses this seminar.

Participants in the workshop will be able to:
·  Explain some of the controversies surrounding development of the DSM-5.
·  Distinguish between categorical and dimensional models of mental disorders.
·  List some disorders that have been added to or removed from the DSM-5.
·  Identify DSM-5 disorders that are commonly encountered in clinical practice.
·  Differentiate between personality trait domains and personality trait facets.

Where: Richmont Graduate University – Atlanta Campus
When: 1:00-4:00 PM Friday June 14, 2013

Follow the link to sign up: https://secure.qgiv.com/for/richmontgrad/event/20560/

Welcome to Richmont’s New Website

We’re proud to announce that our new website is live! We’re hoping that you’ll visit us often to find out more about what is happening in our community. Happy exploring!

Alumni Story: Nick Hersey, LAPC

Alumni Story: Nick Hersey, LAPC

Graduate school was one of the most pivotal decisions in my life.  When I was a teenager I had a miraculous encounter with the Holy Spirit that left me with an unquenchable desire to love on the most broken people of the world.  Throughout my years of ministry I have had a variety of opportunities to work with individuals in very unique ways, but none of the programs and few of the relationships I developed had the impact that I craved.  I realized that I wasn’t equipped to tackle the most challenging obstacles people face: healing from histories of brokenness.  With that, I believed God was calling me to hone my skills in understanding developmental processes, effects of trauma, and how to best recover from them.  I had always been skeptical of the science of psychology and wanted a perspective that was filtered through the lens of Scripture.  After many months of prayer I was sure that God was calling me to pursue my education through Richmont; little did I know just how well He would prepare me!  After being exposed to the world of mental health services I quickly became aware of the quality of education Richmont provides, and how comparable programs left graduates lacking many of the necessary tools to effectively meet clients’ needs.  I couldn’t imagine trying to help UN war refugees work through the horrific tragedies they’ve endured without the caliber of knowledge and depth of experience God blessed me with through my time at Richmont.

Nick Hersey, LAPC
Clinician